Chade-Meng Tan (Meng) is a Google pioneer, award-winning engineer, international bestselling author, thought leader and philanthropist. He retired from Google as its Jolly Good Fellow at the age of 45. He is Chairman of the Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute and Co-chair of One Billion Acts of Peace, which has been nominated eight times for the Nobel Peace Prize. He is also Adjunct Professor at the prestigious Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy in the National University of Singapore.

At Google, Meng led the creation of a groundbreaking mindfulness-based emotional intelligence course called Search Inside Yourself, which was featured on the front page of the Sunday Business section of the New York Times. Search Inside Yourself is also the title of Meng’s New York Times bestselling book which has been endorsed by world leaders such as President Carter of the United States, business leaders such as Eric Schmidt of Google and John Mackey of Whole Foods Markets, and spiritual leaders such as the Dalai Lama. Meng hopes Search Inside Yourself will eventually contribute to world peace in a meaningful way.

Meng delivered a TED talk on compassion at the United Nations and spoke at the White House about the development of kindness. His personal motto is, “Life is too important to be taken seriously”.

Meng hopes to see every workplace in the world become a drinking fountain for happiness and enlightenment.

“Goodness is inherent in all of us however it’s obstructed by 3 major factors: greed, hatred, and ignorance.”

In This Episode:

  • Not seeing dad much growing up because of work
  • Ambition to be successful from very early age
  • The relationship between success and happiness
  • Whether people are inherently good or bad?
  • The barriers to goodness
  • What greed, hatred, and ignorance have to do with each other
  • The burden of having a high IQ
  • The difference between happiness and joy
  • The steps to finding joy
  • Why people get motivated by external factors
  • Comparing and contrasting what an optimal mindset looks like
  • The markers of a still mind
  • Wholesome pleasure vs. unwholesome pleasure

 

Listen via: iTunes | Android | Google Play | Stitcher | RSS

 

 

Quotables:

“Part of the hunger for success arrives from pain.”

“Success does not lead to happiness, however happiness can lead to success.”

“I find that one of my biggest strengths and a gift I was given is the ability to explain esoteric subjects in a way that people can understand.”

“Happiness is defined as a deep sense of flourishing that arises from exceptionally healthy mind. Not a mood, not a feeling, not an emotion. Rather it’s an optimal state of being.”

“Joy is defined as emotion, a fleeting feeling, a moment of pleasant state of mind.”

“To be happy doesn’t mean that every moment is joyful.”

“Access to joy is a skill and all skills are trainable.”

“The first step to training joy is putting the mind to ease.”

“Joy is the default state of mind. Therefore when the mind is alert and relaxed, all it does is simply return to default, which is a joyful mind.”

“Wholesome pleasure is defined as pleasure that is not polluted by greed, hatred, or the seeds of future suffering.”

“Meditation is defined as mental training to familiarize the mind with specific states of mind or specific qualities.”

“Mindfulness is moment-to-moment non-judging attention.”

 

Books:

 

References:

  • Stanford Prison Experiment – an attempt to investigate the psychological effects of perceived power, focusing on the struggle between prisoners and prison guards
  • Jhana – state of mind in which there is serenity and peace

 

Chade-Meng Tan (Meng) is a Google pioneer, award-winning engineer, international bestselling author, thought leader and philanthropist He retired from Google as its Jolly Good Fellow at the age of 45. He is Chairman of the Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute and Co-chair of One Billion Acts of Peace, which has been nominated eight times for the Nobel Peace Prize.